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Boots stores security tags on African & Caribbean products

I had already boycotted them on principle! In my opinion, it’s bad enough that a giant retailer such as Boots, has only recently bothered to cater to the high spending power of the Black woman.


If that didn't send us out a clear message - they now treat us as suspected thieves in their shops and feel the need to protect Black hair care products with security tags!


Boots will not get my money for black hair products
Black Hair is Big Business

Why anyone is surprised is beyond me. I have boycotted boots for years, understanding the ‘power of my pound’ I do not shop I any store that does not acknowledge me as a valuable member of British society. Boots has showed a continued and historic disregard for the Black consumer in its make – up and cosmetics range, despite the known fact that Black women spend considerably more on cosmetics and hair products than our counterparts from other cultural backgrounds.


A customer recently filmed and shared a video online that has captured the difference in security measures taken on products aimed at black consumers and those aimed at white ones.


the UK black hair industry is worth an estimated £88 million, with black women on average spending three times more than white women on hair care, so to be made to feel like second class citizens is an absolute travesty.

The lady who filmed the video is a MAKEUP artist and she shared her criticism of Boots for placing the security tags on Black hair products but not on products aimed at European consumers.

Wright said that she thought it was “really nice” the leading retail brand had embraced black haircare, but added she was really disappointed in the company.

Ms Wright’s video, shows how shelves differed in one Boots’ store at the Wembley High Road. It shows that none of the major brands including L’Oreal, Aussie and Garnier were tagged. In contrast, in the black haircare section, brands such as Cantu and Shea Moisture were stocked with security tags clearly visible on all of the products. One of the items filmed, was placed inside a secure case that could only be opened by Boots’ staff.


Ms Wright included a caption which she posted with the video on Facebook, stating:


“As a person of colour, it’s a wonderful thing when we can do a beauty shop all in one place, it makes you feel included. Now to all of you out there that don’t know, the UK black hair industry is worth an estimated £88 million, with black women on average spending three times more than white women on hair care, so to be made to feel like second class citizens is an absolute travesty.”


Personally, I agree with that statement and I vowed from day one, never to buy my Black haircare products from Boots. As a big brand retailer, known for make up and cosmetics, I have long been disappointed by the lack of products for Black skin and hair, for me, Boots came way too late in the day, and I have made a point of not supporting this brand.

Responding to The Sun Boots were unapologetic saying: They add security tags to the products they believe are being stolen, regardless of what the product is, or which aisle they are stocked.




(This is an opinion piece and the views expressed are solely the views of the author in response to recent news - views shared in this piece do not represent the media site or associated companies).

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